‘Digital Subversion 1 and 2’, 2012, a two-part project curated by Dominic Head

a two-part project/installation curated by Dominic Head, showing new work by artists:

Dominic Head, Debra Singh, and Kelise Franclemont.

Digital Subversion 1:   5 March 2012
Wimbledon College of Art (PSR)
Click here to download the exhibit guide:  DigitalSubversion0001

Kelise Franclemont 'Internet killed the gallery star', 2012, postcard print on paper. Photo credit Dominic Head.

Kelise Franclemont ‘Internet killed the gallery star’, 2012, postcard print on paper. Photo credit Dominic Head.

Head writes:

Kelise Franclemont’s practice expresses the predicament of art in the digital age through a witty manipulation of canonical works of art using the tools available to digital technologies. Internet Killed the Gallery Star (2012) is a subversion of Da Vinci’s iconic Mona Lisa, displayed at the Louvre Gallery, Paris, whereby the figure is morphed, rotated and stretched to appear as a corruption of already broken data streams. Franclemont reduces the size of the portrait to that of a postcard, embellishing it with a frame that one would consider kitsch, given the content and context of the piece. She asks us to consider the relationship between canonical works of art and exclusivity, and points to notions of ubiquity in the understanding of ‘high art’.”

see Head’s blog for more on the exhibit:
http://runninginsquares.wordpress.com/2012/03/05/exhibition-digital-subversions-part-1/

 

 

 


Digital Subversion 2:  14 March 2012
Wimbledon College of Art (Room 213)
Click here to download the exhibit guide:  DigitalSubversion0002

Kelise Franclemont, 'QRitique', 2012, hand-drawing QR code on paper, framed. Image courtesy the artist.

Kelise Franclemont, ‘QRitique’, 2012, hand-drawing QR code on paper, framed. Image courtesy the artist.

“Kelise Franclemont’s second work is at the threshold between canonical works of art and all-encompassing cyberspace. The QR Code has become a common marketing device in the consumption of Western products. Franclemont here uses it as a tool for viewing works of art, making the distinct correllation between the art object and the marketplace.  Viewers must ‘activate’ the work through the technologies of the smartphone, in turn raising concerns as to the ‘exclusivity’ of art and the identity of its audience.  The QR Code becomes therefore a barrier to the truth of the artwork, it becomes the promise of something greater than itself, a link to another world, another space with unforeseeable consequences.”

 

 

Installation View:  
http://www.flickr.com/photos/kelise72/sets/72157629591760079/show/

 

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